Contemporary Art, Furniture & Craft Gallery · Licensed Café

Daisy Cook

Autumn Woodland II 40 x 50 cm

Daisy Cook and her sister Lucy were Peter Cook’s only children from his first marriage to Wendy Snowden. It was his death in 1995 when he was only 57 which motivated Daisy to become a full-time artist and do what she had always wanted to do. Her first show in London was virtually a sell-out and since then she has painted professionally and shown regularly in London at the Northcote Gallery, in USA and in good galleries around the UK. Her work is in a number of corporate collections including a commission for the Bank of England as well as those of celebrities including Julianna Marguilles, Geraldine James, Rory Bremner and Terence Conran. Her work has been reviewed in numerous journals and newspapers including Art Review.

Daisy Cook’s paintings are displayed below.  Please click on an image to view the show in a slideshow with details and price. Please email gallery@sladersyard.co.uk or phone 01308 459511 if you would like to enquire about Daisy Cook’s paintings. Paintings are available to buy now and can be viewed at the gallery by appointment.

Land, sea and sky: those three great elements of our dwelling and of our visual experience, are evoked in Daisy Cook’s work; their interactions patiently witnessed, watched during their processes of transformation. It is good to spend time in the company of these works: they have a particular way of disclosing themselves while light changes, blooms and fades.

These paintings have grown as much from the stuff and fabric of paint, interacting with the material and texture of canvas, as from the remembered and imagined scenes that they suggest. Using a restrained palette of predominantly earth colours – raw umber, raw sienna, Payne’s grey, olive green – Daisy Cook explores the geological structures that underlie and form landscape. The paint is, in a small way, subject to pressures similar to those that occur over millennia – processes of erosion, compression and liquefaction. A work is often initiated by drizzling thin paint onto canvas that has been laid across the floor – a process in which chance as well as intention is at play. The marks so made form a material starting point: an original matter, waiting for the spark of life to ignite them. The palette of Daisy Cook’s early work was exuberantly, almost decoratively, colourful – pinks, blues and golds which made for works of great beauty. Her work has evolved (like the landscape it suggests) into something still beautiful but much starker, more geometric. A paring down to what is elemental. The geometric shapes represent an analysis of the seen world. At times they are reminiscent of Paul Nash’s paintings of the sea and beach at Dymchurch. The Danish painter, Per Kirkeby (who is also a geologist) is an important reference in Cook’s work. With Nash and Kirkeby there is a sense of what some might call the ‘mystical’ which is never alluded to in a heavy-handed or literal way: it is simply the life that the light discloses and which in turn initiates change.

Elizabeth Cook, poet

May 2015

commas

Land, sea and sky: those three great elements of our dwelling and of our visual experience, are evoked in Daisy Cook’s work; their interactions patiently witnessed, watched during their processes of transformation. It is good to spend time in the company of these works: they have a particular way of disclosing themselves while light changes, blooms and fades… There is a sense of what some might call the ‘mystical’ which is never alluded to in a heavy-handed or literal way: it is simply the life that the light discloses and which in turn initiates change.

ELIZABETH COOK

Daisy Cook’s new work… evokes the previous histories of a landscape, the ghosts of presences and alignments long gone but still discernible. The thin liquid paint, with its runs and drips, suggests rather than states, while her colour evokes a complexity of mood that is almost archaeological in its analysis of varying traces.

ANDREW LAMBIRTH ART CRITIC